Tuesday, 7 October 2014

Toshiba Glass Prototype Unveiled; Hoped to Rival Google Glass in 2015

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After Google and Sony, Toshiba has now jumped onto the smart glasses bandwagon - showcasing its Toshiba Glass prototype at the Ceatec trade show this week in Japan.
The Toshiba Glass, like Google Glass, features a small lightweight projector attached to the right-side frame of the glass. However, the projector works differently from Google Glass in Toshiba's prototype wearable.
The projector on the Toshiba Glass projects images on to a series of thin, vertical prisms which are almost invisible but reflect light back to the eye to provide an augmented reality display. Google Glass on the other hand includes a prism over the lens to reflect the content to the user's eye.
Engadget Japan reports (via PC World) that Toshiba Glass weighs roughly 42 grams, which is said to be roughly the same as the weigh of Google Glass, and will also come in three types of frame options - standard, sporty and industrial.
One of the biggest differences between Toshiba Glass and Google Glass, as noted by PC World, is that the Japanese giant's prototype glasses are not wireless. The glasses connect to the user's smartphone through a wire and utilises the mobile's battery as it lacks its own. Toshiba explained that it did not include the battery as it would make the glasses too heavy - a problem that Google evidently found a solution to. Also, the glasses themselves have no computing power, and simple act as an augmented reality headset.
Toshiba has not yet confirmed the price or the release date of the device, but the company representatives did mention that the glasses might hit the shelves next year in Japan and North America. With its more basic specifications, it should also be much cheaper than Google Glass - which currently retails for $1,500.
Last month, Sony also announced its interest in smart glasses, with its prototype SmartEyeglass. Similar to Google Glass eye-wear, Sony is working on a smartphone-powered solution that superimposes information such as text, symbols, and images, onto the user's field of view